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Our bioreactor technology
  Highly automated devices for the creation and study of biomimetic human tissues  
At Codex, we specialise in the design and development of perfusion bioreactors aimed at growing and studying human tissues. Tissues are intricate three-dimensional structures composed of different types of cells and extracellular matrix. They require finely calibrated conditions in order to grow properly and mimic the complexity seen in nature (that is, to be biomimetic). Perfusion bioreactors are the most physiologically relevant bioreactor systems as they provide a flow of medium through the system similar to the flow of blood in our circulatory systems.
Bioreactor designs and operating conditions necessarily vary between different tissues due to their unique biological environments, however the principles remain the same. Culturing any type of tissue in a bioreactor requires a sterile environment with temperature and pH control, as well as adequate supply of nutrients and removal of waste by a perfusion system that also provides appropriate shear stress specific to that tissue. This process is demonstrated here in the context of our current collaboration on the intricate cardiovascular system.

1

A porous, tubular scaffold is housed in a chamber to serve as an anchor for initial cell attachment and growth.

2

Even cell distribution of human epithelial cells and smooth muscle cells on the scaffold is optimised through automated, dynamic cell seeding - forming a bilayered graft.

3

Pulsatile flow through the graft lumen provides physiologically relevant shear force.

4

In-line sensors for temperature, pressure, flow, pH and nutrient concentration feed data back to software in real-time, allowing for automatic control and data acquisition.

5

Cell growth, synthesis of extracellular matrix components and tissue formation occur over time as media is perfused throughout the system.

1

A porous, tubular scaffold is housed in a chamber to serve as an anchor for initial cell attachment and growth.

2

Even cell distribution of human epithelial cells and smooth muscle cells on the scaffold is optimised through automated, dynamic cell seeding - forming a bilayered graft.

3

Pulsatile flow through the graft lumen provides physiologically relevant shear force.

4

In-line sensors for temperature, pressure, flow, pH and nutrient concentration feed data back to software in real-time, allowing for automatic control and data acquisition.

5

Cell growth, synthesis of extracellular matrix components and tissue formation occur over time as media is perfused throughout the system.